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Tutorial 1: Building the simplest MS Excel dashboard

February 17, 2012

Are you tired of searching for that simple practical easy step-by-step solution on how to build an excel dashboard without wasting much time and without getting bored flipping through infinite information?

Then relax coz you have arrived at your ultimate destination.

If you want to build the most basic form of an Excel Dashboard from scratch, just go through the image below: For conceptual explanation Go through this presentation:

A Quick Simple MS Excel Dashboard

Snapshot of Tutorial 1: Building the simplest MS Excel dashboard

Our Simplest Dashboard has a single indicator which is a pie-chart tracking the % break-up of all expenses incurred till date. To create this database we follow 4 steps:

Step 1: Present the data in a “list format”

Step 2: Filter out the essential data from the list

Step 3: Create a metric by processing the filtered data

Step 4: Assign a visual indicator to the metric

To download the Excel file you can access the adjacent box (Downloads >> Tutorials >> Tutorial 1)

Or download it from the following link:

https://www.box.com/s/cltdd0lt8jsbgsz675zl

This concept can be extended to create more complex forms of dashboards. They can also be very handy tools of precise analysis on a regular basis.

For more information keep watching this space!

 
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From → A. Tutorials

13 Comments
  1. Rupa permalink

    Thanks Pranav, Nice and easy to follow. Thanks for sharing your knowledge

  2. Mukul Jain permalink

    Hi Pranav,

    nice work. great example and easy to use :)

  3. You may like to take a look at DashboardPlus (www.dashboardmore.com) , the only TRUE Excel Dashboard creator!

    Best regards

    Avi

  4. Felipe permalink

    Hi, Pranav,

    OK, I´ll be waiting for the next tutorial to try to understand your point!
    Keep up the good work!

    Thanks,

    Felipe

  5. Hi Felipe,
    Thanks for your response.
    You are right that the SUMIFS construct seems rather time consuming compared to a PivotChart..
    However, it becomes less useful when I want to choose what data needs to be filtered or referenced directly from my dashboard. SUMIFS plays a critical role in such interactive dashboards because of its power to flexibly refer to a single record or a group of records in a data list. I doubt if PivotCharts can give me complex customizations which SUMIFS allows to.
    In my next tutorial, I plan to write about basic interactive dashboards. I hope the usage of SUMIFS become much clearer then.

    Thanks again.
    -Pranav

  6. Felipe permalink

    Dear Pranav, that’s a great example of a simple dashboard, thanks for sharing!

    But why do you find the SUMIFS construction better than a PivotChart one? In the example you mentioned I would rather build the dashboard utilizing a PivotChart, because whenever a new Expenditure type (using your example) is added, the PivotChart would only need to be refreshed and the new Expenditure type would be shown.
    However, using the SUMIFS construction you would have to manually add all of the new Expenditure types, losing time and productivity.

    Thank you once again for sharing and I’ll be waiting for your comments!

    Best regards,

    Felipe

  7. Mangesh permalink

    I must say its informative…!!
    carry on..looking forward to next tutorial

  8. nice to see a useful and efficient way. Best of Luck !!!

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